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3 Exercises for a Better Butt

I am praying that based off this title alone I don’t lose a couple hundred men subscribers. Sorry guys, have to give the women what they want also. Although I know the majority of people that will be interested in reading this article will be women, men too can benefit from these exercises. Yes, the three exercises that we will talk about today are great for building a better gluteus maximus. However, there are some benefits other than just having a better looking butt. First off, women are not necessarily the only ones that should be concerned about building their gluteus maximus. Men, especially if you are competing in bodybuilding or aesthetics, also need to develop a body that is complete. Second, a couple of the exercises covered in this article are great for developing strength in the gluteus maximus and also the hamstrings that will help in the squat and other lifts. Now back to the women, if your butt routine does not include these three exercises or some close variation you have a huge gap in your programming.

 

Barbell Glute Bridges

How:

  • Use a bar and a bar pad to cushion the pressure of the weight on your pelvic area.
  • Either have a partner place the bar on your hips if the weight is light enough or roll the bar up your legs yourself into the starting position across the front of your hips.
  • Your upper back/shoulders should be resting on the edge of a bench. Be as comfortable as possible.
  • The bar should be across the front of your hips.
  • Have your legs bent to about 90 degrees and feet flat on the floor.
  • Hold onto the bar with both hands
  • Start with your hips low. As low as possible. If you feel pressure on your lower back do not go quite as low.
  • Begin the upward thrusting movement by pushing thru your heels. You should never be on your toes.
  • Go until your hips are locked out at the top.
  • Lower your hips again. Still being careful of your lower back.
  • Repeat

Sets/Reps:

  • The sets and reps can very on this exercise depending on why you are doing it.
  • If you are focusing on the contraction and trying to get a “pump” in your glutes then use lighter weight and high volume. (i.e. 4 sets x 12-20 reps)
  • My advice would be to try and go heavier on this exercise because the barbell allows you to add heavier weight than most other butt exercises you are going to try so take advantage of that. (i.e. 4 sets x 8-12 reps)

Note:

  • No matter your goals you want to execute a full range of motion but how long you hold at the top of the movement is goal dependent.
  • If moving as much weight as possible is the goal you are not going to fully squeeze or contract your glutes at the top of the movement.
  • However, if the contraction or “pump” is the goal then you are going to pause and hold for a moment at the top of the movement focusing on squeezing or flexing your glutes.


Can’t play video? Click here: Barbell Glute Bridges

 

Cable Kickbacks

How

  • Using the lowest possible setting on the cable machine attach a cable attachment to one of your ankles.
  • Take a step or two back from the machine to create some tension on the cable.
  • Hold on to the cable pulley with both hands.
  • Depending on how tall you are the amount of lean to your upper body will differ but it always feels better to me when I have more of a lean. But then again I am taller than most people.
  • Have your feet parallel and close to each other.
  • Begin the movement by bending your knee slightly.
  • Kick your leg as straight back as possible keeping your knee slightly bent.
  • Continue to kickback and up until you feel the squeeze go from your glutes into your lower back and stop.
  • Find the height that you feel the greatest squeeze in your glute.
  • Return to the starting position keeping your knee slightly bent throughout.
  • Repeat.

Sets/Reps:

  • Because this exercise is not a strength builder you are going to want to use higher reps and focus on the contraction at the top of the movement.
  • 4 sets x 15-25 reps

Note:

  • You can also perform this exercises by using an exercise band by wrapping it around a post and your ankle.


Can’t play video? Click here: Cable Kicks

 

Reach Thru’s

How

  • Attach a D-handle to the lowest possible setting on a cable machine.
  • Face away from the cable pulley.
  • Reach down in between your legs to grab the handle with both hands.
  • Holding the handle walk out away from the pulley creating tension on the cable.
  • Pull it up and between your legs so that you are standing tall with the handle at your groin.
  • Begin the movement by hinging (i.e. shifting your weight back onto your heels) letting the handle go back between your legs.
  • When you hinge you should think about your hips going straight back and your knees being slightly bent being sure not to lock them out.
  • As you let the handle go back between your legs you should feel a good stretch in your hamstrings.
  • When you feel you maxed out the stretch in your hamstrings begin returning to the starting position by simply standing up from the hinge position.
  • You are not pulling the cable with your hands. They are simply holding the handle as you hinge and return to the starting position.
  • Be sure to push thru your heels as you are standing up and squeeze your glutes at the top of the movement.
  • Repeat.

Sets/Reps:

  • This exercise can be done with a couple different goals in mind.
  • It is a useful exercise to warm up your glutes and hamstrings for squats and/or deadlifts.
  • If done for this reason execute just enough reps to get those areas warmed up.

(i.e. 3 sets x 15-20 reps)

  • If executing this exercise for the purpose of specifically training your hamstrings and glutes then you are going to want to do higher volume (i.e. 4 sets x 15-25 reps).


Can’t play video? Click here: Reach Thru’s

 

As always, thanks for reading and be sure to support the site by subscribing with your email.

2 Exercises to Improve Shoulder Stability

I’m not sure there is a single body part that is more frustrating than the shoulder. The shoulder joint is the most mobile joint in the human body with 120 degrees of flexion available. This mobility is useful for achieving great athletic feats but can be a detriment when the shoulder is put in a compromising position. I recommend performing the following two exercises multiple times a week to accomplish two goals, maintain and/or improve mobility in the shoulder joint and strengthen the shoulder girdle as a whole. (Side note, the turkish get-up is a staple of my program for these vary reasons but it deserves its own article coming soon.)

Arm Bar

The arm bar is an exercise that I recommend as an extended warm-up or as part of a movement prep at the beginning of a workout. But it can fit in perfectly anywhere in the workout as the coach sees fit. The arm bar accomplishes a couple of things. Depending on the athlete, it can be a useful stretch anywhere from the delts, to the lats, to the biceps, and so on. I know I personally feel it instantly in my biceps and rear delt which is not surprising as those are two trouble areas for me in terms of tightness. The second thing it is great for is causing the stabilizing muscles of the shoulder joint to fire. When done correctly as shown in the video below, the shoulder joint is the only thing stabilizing the arm to hold the kettlebell overhead.  

  1. Start lying flat on your back. Legs straight. Kettlebell resting on chest with both hands grasping handle.
  2. Press the kettlebell with both hands, taking the hand of the arm not doing the exercise (the off arm) off when the arms are fully extended. Bend the knee of the same side leg until the foot is flat on floor near glutes.
  3. The off arm starts out flat on floor extending away from torso. The off leg starts out flat and straight on floor in line with rest of body.
  4. Push off the bent leg rotating that hip towards the floor on the opposite side. Try your best to get the hip to touch and remain in contact with the floor.
  5. It’s at first okay for your same side leg to now be slightly bent flat on the floor. But when comfortable straighten it and slide it across the floor until it is parallel with your other leg (the off leg.)
  6. When you feel that your arm and kettlebell are stable slowly slide your off arm across the floor until it is overhead. Your body should now be in a straight line from off hand down to both of your feet.
  7. I usually have my athletes hold this position from anywhere between 20 and 30 seconds before switching arms.

Tips:

  • Be careful and progress the weight slowly especially when first learning the exercise.
  • When comfortable you want to make sure that the weight is challenging enough to reap the full benefits of the exercise.
  • When your off arm and leg are extended away from your body they are giving you extra stability but when you straighten both your leg and arm out so that your body is in a straight line that extra stability disappears and the exercise becomes significantly more difficult,
  • If you are coaching young athletes they my at first be nervous about feeling their shoulder stabilizing, you can usually visually see the shoulder pulsating, make sure to ensure them that this is the goal of the exercise and as long as their arm is in the locked out position they are doing it correctly.

Video Here:  Arm Bar

Bottoms-Up Press

One of my favorite kettlebell exercises is the kettlebell press overhead. It is a great unilateral exercise that allows the shoulder to move naturally and freely. A variation of the kettlebell press that I love to implement to work shoulder stability is the bottoms-up press. The bottoms-up press takes the kettlebell and turns it upside down. In this position the actual ball is on top of the handle, making balancing the bell the main objective as you press it overhead. Naturally, the weight is significantly lighter compared to the conventional kettlebell press but this exercise can be very tiring and even more frustrating.

  1. Hold the kettlebell upside down in one hand.
  2. When you have it balanced proceed to press it overhead being sure to press until your arm is in the lock out position.
  3. Return the bell to the starting position.

Tips:

  • The first thing this will test is your grip strength as simply holding the bell in the upside down position is challenging.
  • This is a great exercise for learning how to create tension throughout the entire body as you will have to be tense throughout to successfully press a challenging weight overhead.
  • It helps to make a tight fist with your opposite hand. This is something called irradiation where the tension travels to other parts of your body.
  • I usually don’t prescribe over 5 reps per set because in my opinion anything higher defeats the purpose of what this exercise should be intended for. If someone can complete more than 5 reps with a certain weight the weight is not challenging enough and the athlete does not need to create a significant amount of tension.
  • With this exercise being dependent on small muscles playing a big role increasing the weight can be a challenge even if someone can complete multiple reps at a certain weight.
  • To counter act this, if an athlete is repping out a certain wright but cannot consistently complete reps at the next weight I have them practice just holding the bell in the upside down positon for a certain amount of time (usually 20-30 seconds) and that seems to help them progress.

Video Here:  Bottoms Up Press

Prioritize It

In my opinion implementing correctives that target the shoulder girdle should be a major priority for strength and conditioning coaches. I also want to mention that I believe everyone can benefit from strengthening their shoulder girdle as a whole as it will help them progress in whatever their goals may be. These two exercises in this article should also be used by anyone with nagging shoulder injuries. Give these exercises a shot and do them consistently for a period of time and I bet that you see an improvement in a number of different aspects of your training.

As always, thanks for reading and be sure to support this site by subscribing with your email.

Its a Kettlebell, Not CrossFit

It’s a Kettlebell

One of the most underutilized tools in training is the kettlebell. I love using kettlebells in my own training, and it and the barbell are my favorite tools to use with my clients. Over the last decade or so kettlebells have become synonymous with CrossFit. Few things get under my skin as bad as when I show someone a kettlebell and their response is, “oh, CrossFit.” The kettlebell has been around since the 1700s and CrossFit has been around since the year 2000.

Many people see the kettlebell as something CrossFit uses and nothing else. People do not realize the benefits the kettlebell offers to people no matter their reason for training. I use kettlebells when training athletes, people rehabbing injuries, and the general population just looking to get healthier. I hope that this article will shed some light on the benefits of kettlebells and why people with all types of goals should consider adding kettlebell training to their regimen.

Strength

Kettlebells are great way to build strength. With kettlebells, you can become stronger in the squat, pressing, and hinging movements in a variety of ways. This variation allows you to test movements in a way that is hard to do with other tools, including barbells. By testing these movements in different ways, you can find weak points that could be holding you back from making strength gains. For example, you can perform the squat by holding a kettlebell in a goblet position (as pictured below), a single rack position, and a double rack position. Each of these offer different benefits that help improve your squat overall. The same can be said for presses by pressing kettlebells overhead in a strict, push press, or bottoms up position as pictured below.

Lastly, two great exercises for the hip hinge using kettlebells are the deadlift and the swing. Using a kettlebell for the deadlift can be a strength exercise for novice lifters or for rehabbing injuries and is also a great way to teach the hip hinge in a safe manner. The kettlebell swing is a dynamic exercise that offers a lot of different benefits such as flexibility, power, and conditioning. You will read more about the swing in the following paragraphs. What is important to remember is that you can do these movements with very heavy kettlebells. This will obviously make you stronger directly but it will also carry over to heavier barbell lifts. Training with kettlebells enables you to use heavy weight unilaterally, meaning one arm at a time, and this will help with any strength imbalances that may be holding you back.

 

Pictured above is the Goblet Squat (Left) and the Bottoms up Position (Right)

Conditioning

I hate conditioning. It’s no secret to those close to me that I don’t do a lot, if any, conditioning in the traditional sense. You probably won’t see me out jogging around town anytime soon. However, as much as it pains me to say it, I know conditioning is a necessary evil. I try my best to avoid it as much as possible, at least traditional conditioning anyhow. So, I find different ways to implement conditioning into my training. Kettlebells are one of my favorite ways to do this. The previously mentioned kettlebell swings will get you huffing and puffing like few exercises can. Don’t believe me? Go ahead and do twenty-five of them in a row. Then after you catch your breath come back and tell me that didn’t get your heart rate up.

Carries are also a great conditioning tool. I could have put carries in the strength section also. This exercises is exactly how it sounds. You carry heavy weight for either distance or time. This will challenge you in more way than one. Heavy carries will build grip strength, build a bigger upper back, and keep your shoulders healthy, but you may be surprised how out of breath you are when you finally set the weight down. I’d much rather go for a walk carrying kettlebells then go for a run around my neighborhood. In fact, to this day the most humbling feat I’ve ever attempted was carrying two heavy kettlebells through town and back. It took roughly an hour to complete and I was surprised and embarrassed about how exhausted and out of breath I was. Now, before you go telling everyone you know that I said all you have to do is swing and carry a kettlebell and you will be able to run a marathon, conditioning in this section referrers to general conditioning. If you want to be able to run a 5k, you still must go out and run.

Flexibility

The flexibility you can gain from training with kettlebells is probably my favorite reason for using them. The way the kettlebell fits around your hand and rests against your arm in what is called the rack position (as pictured below) allows for freedom of movement that you can’t get with a dumbbell. The kettlebell becomes an extension of your arm, it becomes a part of your body, allowing for natural movement to occur. This freedom of movement that a kettlebell allows is why it is a great tool for improving flexibility. You can move naturally and improve flexibility while performing “strength” movements. For example, by holding the kettlebell in the rack position and pressing it overhead, your shoulder can move freely and naturally as the weight travels overhead. At the top of the movement you can focus on placing your extended arm over your head utilizing its full range of motion instead of the arm being too far forward and sacrificing the end range of movement which is commonly seen. The previously mentioned goblet squat is also a great example as it is an easier and safer way to teach the squat than with the bar. It allows you to practice achieving great depth in the squat, gaining flexibility in your hips. Also, there are many corrective type exercises that are great for rehabbing or preventing injuries. There will be an article coming soon on how to use kettlebells for injury prevention.

Pictured above is the Rack Position

Not CrossFit

The strength, conditioning, and flexibility benefits of kettlebells are priceless. All three are a great reason to include kettlebells into your programs. This article didn’t even go into detail about the corrective exercise benefits or the teaching benefits of kettlebells. Rehab or injury prevention for any type of person could have also been a section in this article and will be an article in the future. I touched a little on the teaching benefits of kettlebells when discussing the deadlift and squat and it really is a great tool for teaching the basic movements in a safe manner. I hope that this article shed some light on the benefits of kettlebells and maybe next time you see one you won’t automatically think CrossFit! Please subscribe to this site and share this article so that I can continue to reach more people.