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Perfecting the Kettlebell Swing

One of my favorite kettlebell exercises is the kettlebell swing, and thanks in part to CrossFit, it is one of the most well-known uses of the kettlebell. As a trainer, there have been many occasions where a client has told me that they have done swings in the past. I always ask to do a few swings and let me observe their technique. After several swings I find myself cringing and stopping them before I watch them injure themselves. Most people do not realize the technique involved with the swing and end up tweaking their lower back. It should be no surprise that swinging a weight in the shape of a ball fast between your legs can lead to discomfort if done wrong. Fortunately for you, I’ve become efficient at teaching the swing using these three steps below.

Step 1: The Hike Pass

  1. Place the bell a foot or so in front of you.
  2. Your feet should be in your power stance. The same or similar stance to the deadlift stance.
  3. Hinge down to the bell by pushing your hips back. Being sure not to lock your knees.
  4. Ensure that your back is flat and tight when you push your hips back.
  5. Grab the bell with both hands and tilt the bell towards you.
  6. Hike the bell high and tight between your legs letting the bell go through your legs and not stopping at your groin.
  7. Return the bell to the starting position on the ground.
  8. Repeat the hike pass until you feel comfortable. (I usually have clients do a set of 5-8)

Tips:

  • Hiking the bell high and tight is a major key in the swing. You want to hike it right at your groin.
  • The bell going to low through your legs will make the swing feel awkward and will put major strain on your lower back.
  • Make sure the bell goes through your legs and doesn’t stop at your groin. So if someone was watching you from the side they would be able to see the bell behind you at the top of the hike pass.

Video Here: Hike Pass

Step 2: Feeling the Weight Shift

  1. Repeat the hike pass but do not return the bell to the starting position.
  2. Instead, let the bell float out in front of you and swing back in between your legs as in the hike pass.
  3. Be sure not to raise your chest or try to stand upwards.
  4. Let the bell swing back and forth being sure it is going high and tight between your legs every rep.
  5. As the bell swings back and forth notice your weight sift from front to back. Do not fight this feeling.
  6. As the bell goes back between your legs your weight should shift to the mid/front of your feet. As the bell swings forward out in front of you your weight should shift to the mid/back of your feet.
  7. Your back should remain flat and tight as the bell swings back and forth and again be sure not to raise your chest or try to stand up.
  8. Repeat until comfortable. (Again, I usually have clients do 5-8 reps)

Video Here: Weight Shift

Step 3: The Full Swing

  1. Repeat the hike pass.
  2. As you hike the bell feel your weight shift in your feet.
  3. As the bell comes forward thrust your hips forward and stand upright.
  4. At the top of the swing you should be completely upright.
  5. Be sure not to arch your lower back.
  6. Squeeze your glutes at the top of the swing.
  7. At the top of the swing the bell should be right at eye level.
  8. Let the bell float back down between your legs high and tight.
  9. Repeat (Except for the hike pass) for the prescribed number of repetitions.

Tips:

  • Thrust your hips forward by driving through your heels.
  • You should never feel like you are on your toes as the bell is coming upwards.
  • You should be able to see over the bell at the top of the swing.
  • Your eyes should follow the bell throughout the entire swing. Do not try to look upwards or forward and do not try to keep a “big chest” as the bell is coming back down between your legs. (This is a very common mistake)
  • Do not “baby” your hip thrust to get the bell going upwards. It should be a quick, powerful movement.
  • If your shoulders are getting tired throughout the swings you are using your arms to swing the bell instead of using your hips. Treat your arms as only ropes hanging onto the bell.

Video Here: KB Swing

Benefits

  1. Great for developing power from the hinge position.
  2. Once soreness disappears from the first few times trying this exercise you will see improved flexibility in your hamstrings.
  3. Can be done for many repetitions and used as a fun way to get your heart rate up (Trust me, do 25 of these consecutively and you will have to catch your breath afterwards)
  4. Activation of your glutes and hamstrings.

Try it Out

Have some fun implementing the kettlebell swing into your training program. Include it in different parts of your workout and see when it best fits you and your goals. Once you are efficient at the swing try all different kinds of weights to get a different feeling each time.

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Its a Kettlebell, Not CrossFit

It’s a Kettlebell

One of the most underutilized tools in training is the kettlebell. I love using kettlebells in my own training, and it and the barbell are my favorite tools to use with my clients. Over the last decade or so kettlebells have become synonymous with CrossFit. Few things get under my skin as bad as when I show someone a kettlebell and their response is, “oh, CrossFit.” The kettlebell has been around since the 1700s and CrossFit has been around since the year 2000.

Many people see the kettlebell as something CrossFit uses and nothing else. People do not realize the benefits the kettlebell offers to people no matter their reason for training. I use kettlebells when training athletes, people rehabbing injuries, and the general population just looking to get healthier. I hope that this article will shed some light on the benefits of kettlebells and why people with all types of goals should consider adding kettlebell training to their regimen.

Strength

Kettlebells are great way to build strength. With kettlebells, you can become stronger in the squat, pressing, and hinging movements in a variety of ways. This variation allows you to test movements in a way that is hard to do with other tools, including barbells. By testing these movements in different ways, you can find weak points that could be holding you back from making strength gains. For example, you can perform the squat by holding a kettlebell in a goblet position (as pictured below), a single rack position, and a double rack position. Each of these offer different benefits that help improve your squat overall. The same can be said for presses by pressing kettlebells overhead in a strict, push press, or bottoms up position as pictured below.

Lastly, two great exercises for the hip hinge using kettlebells are the deadlift and the swing. Using a kettlebell for the deadlift can be a strength exercise for novice lifters or for rehabbing injuries and is also a great way to teach the hip hinge in a safe manner. The kettlebell swing is a dynamic exercise that offers a lot of different benefits such as flexibility, power, and conditioning. You will read more about the swing in the following paragraphs. What is important to remember is that you can do these movements with very heavy kettlebells. This will obviously make you stronger directly but it will also carry over to heavier barbell lifts. Training with kettlebells enables you to use heavy weight unilaterally, meaning one arm at a time, and this will help with any strength imbalances that may be holding you back.

 

Pictured above is the Goblet Squat (Left) and the Bottoms up Position (Right)

Conditioning

I hate conditioning. It’s no secret to those close to me that I don’t do a lot, if any, conditioning in the traditional sense. You probably won’t see me out jogging around town anytime soon. However, as much as it pains me to say it, I know conditioning is a necessary evil. I try my best to avoid it as much as possible, at least traditional conditioning anyhow. So, I find different ways to implement conditioning into my training. Kettlebells are one of my favorite ways to do this. The previously mentioned kettlebell swings will get you huffing and puffing like few exercises can. Don’t believe me? Go ahead and do twenty-five of them in a row. Then after you catch your breath come back and tell me that didn’t get your heart rate up.

Carries are also a great conditioning tool. I could have put carries in the strength section also. This exercises is exactly how it sounds. You carry heavy weight for either distance or time. This will challenge you in more way than one. Heavy carries will build grip strength, build a bigger upper back, and keep your shoulders healthy, but you may be surprised how out of breath you are when you finally set the weight down. I’d much rather go for a walk carrying kettlebells then go for a run around my neighborhood. In fact, to this day the most humbling feat I’ve ever attempted was carrying two heavy kettlebells through town and back. It took roughly an hour to complete and I was surprised and embarrassed about how exhausted and out of breath I was. Now, before you go telling everyone you know that I said all you have to do is swing and carry a kettlebell and you will be able to run a marathon, conditioning in this section referrers to general conditioning. If you want to be able to run a 5k, you still must go out and run.

Flexibility

The flexibility you can gain from training with kettlebells is probably my favorite reason for using them. The way the kettlebell fits around your hand and rests against your arm in what is called the rack position (as pictured below) allows for freedom of movement that you can’t get with a dumbbell. The kettlebell becomes an extension of your arm, it becomes a part of your body, allowing for natural movement to occur. This freedom of movement that a kettlebell allows is why it is a great tool for improving flexibility. You can move naturally and improve flexibility while performing “strength” movements. For example, by holding the kettlebell in the rack position and pressing it overhead, your shoulder can move freely and naturally as the weight travels overhead. At the top of the movement you can focus on placing your extended arm over your head utilizing its full range of motion instead of the arm being too far forward and sacrificing the end range of movement which is commonly seen. The previously mentioned goblet squat is also a great example as it is an easier and safer way to teach the squat than with the bar. It allows you to practice achieving great depth in the squat, gaining flexibility in your hips. Also, there are many corrective type exercises that are great for rehabbing or preventing injuries. There will be an article coming soon on how to use kettlebells for injury prevention.

Pictured above is the Rack Position

Not CrossFit

The strength, conditioning, and flexibility benefits of kettlebells are priceless. All three are a great reason to include kettlebells into your programs. This article didn’t even go into detail about the corrective exercise benefits or the teaching benefits of kettlebells. Rehab or injury prevention for any type of person could have also been a section in this article and will be an article in the future. I touched a little on the teaching benefits of kettlebells when discussing the deadlift and squat and it really is a great tool for teaching the basic movements in a safe manner. I hope that this article shed some light on the benefits of kettlebells and maybe next time you see one you won’t automatically think CrossFit! Please subscribe to this site and share this article so that I can continue to reach more people.