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Perfecting the Kettlebell Swing

One of my favorite kettlebell exercises is the kettlebell swing, and thanks in part to CrossFit, it is one of the most well-known uses of the kettlebell. As a trainer, there have been many occasions where a client has told me that they have done swings in the past. I always ask to do a few swings and let me observe their technique. After several swings I find myself cringing and stopping them before I watch them injure themselves. Most people do not realize the technique involved with the swing and end up tweaking their lower back. It should be no surprise that swinging a weight in the shape of a ball fast between your legs can lead to discomfort if done wrong. Fortunately for you, I’ve become efficient at teaching the swing using these three steps below.

Step 1: The Hike Pass

  1. Place the bell a foot or so in front of you.
  2. Your feet should be in your power stance. The same or similar stance to the deadlift stance.
  3. Hinge down to the bell by pushing your hips back. Being sure not to lock your knees.
  4. Ensure that your back is flat and tight when you push your hips back.
  5. Grab the bell with both hands and tilt the bell towards you.
  6. Hike the bell high and tight between your legs letting the bell go through your legs and not stopping at your groin.
  7. Return the bell to the starting position on the ground.
  8. Repeat the hike pass until you feel comfortable. (I usually have clients do a set of 5-8)

Tips:

  • Hiking the bell high and tight is a major key in the swing. You want to hike it right at your groin.
  • The bell going to low through your legs will make the swing feel awkward and will put major strain on your lower back.
  • Make sure the bell goes through your legs and doesn’t stop at your groin. So if someone was watching you from the side they would be able to see the bell behind you at the top of the hike pass.

Video Here: Hike Pass

Step 2: Feeling the Weight Shift

  1. Repeat the hike pass but do not return the bell to the starting position.
  2. Instead, let the bell float out in front of you and swing back in between your legs as in the hike pass.
  3. Be sure not to raise your chest or try to stand upwards.
  4. Let the bell swing back and forth being sure it is going high and tight between your legs every rep.
  5. As the bell swings back and forth notice your weight sift from front to back. Do not fight this feeling.
  6. As the bell goes back between your legs your weight should shift to the mid/front of your feet. As the bell swings forward out in front of you your weight should shift to the mid/back of your feet.
  7. Your back should remain flat and tight as the bell swings back and forth and again be sure not to raise your chest or try to stand up.
  8. Repeat until comfortable. (Again, I usually have clients do 5-8 reps)

Video Here: Weight Shift

Step 3: The Full Swing

  1. Repeat the hike pass.
  2. As you hike the bell feel your weight shift in your feet.
  3. As the bell comes forward thrust your hips forward and stand upright.
  4. At the top of the swing you should be completely upright.
  5. Be sure not to arch your lower back.
  6. Squeeze your glutes at the top of the swing.
  7. At the top of the swing the bell should be right at eye level.
  8. Let the bell float back down between your legs high and tight.
  9. Repeat (Except for the hike pass) for the prescribed number of repetitions.

Tips:

  • Thrust your hips forward by driving through your heels.
  • You should never feel like you are on your toes as the bell is coming upwards.
  • You should be able to see over the bell at the top of the swing.
  • Your eyes should follow the bell throughout the entire swing. Do not try to look upwards or forward and do not try to keep a “big chest” as the bell is coming back down between your legs. (This is a very common mistake)
  • Do not “baby” your hip thrust to get the bell going upwards. It should be a quick, powerful movement.
  • If your shoulders are getting tired throughout the swings you are using your arms to swing the bell instead of using your hips. Treat your arms as only ropes hanging onto the bell.

Video Here: KB Swing

Benefits

  1. Great for developing power from the hinge position.
  2. Once soreness disappears from the first few times trying this exercise you will see improved flexibility in your hamstrings.
  3. Can be done for many repetitions and used as a fun way to get your heart rate up (Trust me, do 25 of these consecutively and you will have to catch your breath afterwards)
  4. Activation of your glutes and hamstrings.

Try it Out

Have some fun implementing the kettlebell swing into your training program. Include it in different parts of your workout and see when it best fits you and your goals. Once you are efficient at the swing try all different kinds of weights to get a different feeling each time.

As always, thanks for reading and please support the site by subscribing with your email and stay up to date on future articles.

 

 

How to Deadlift (Conventional)

First, Respect It

It’s hard to describe, the feeling that runs through my body when I hear someone describe an exercise as dangerous. The weight room is not unlike many situations in life. If you do something carelessly or incorrectly the chances of you becoming injured increase substantially. However, if you use common sense, remain focused, and are aware of certain things, those chances of becoming injured decrease by a large margin. There are no dangerous exercises. Sure, there are exercises that come with more risk if done improperly compared to other exercises, but I don’t believe they should be tagged with the word dangerous. The deadlift is usually the exercise most commonly associated with this “dangerous” stereotype. The squat is a close second but that will come in a later article. Yes, if you deadlift improperly and without care you are probably going to injure yourself, most likely not seriously, but enough to make you think it’s the exercise that is the problem and not you. Well friend, I’m here to tell you it’s not the exercise, it’s you. It’s you and the person trying to teach you the exercise that watched a few deadlift videos on YouTube that is the problem. Lifting heavy weight off the ground is no joke, it’s a grown man, or grown woman, lift. It needs to be respected. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been in a local gym and have seen someone attempting to do a set of deadlifts. They are texting on their phone, walk up to the bar, joking around with their buddies, talking to them, sometimes even laughing all the while grabbing the bar to pick it up, they complete a few painful looking reps, set it back down and walk away saying their back hurts. Respect the deadlift enough to learn how to do it properly and the “dangerous” stereotype will soon be a thing of the past. Here is how to perform a correct conventional deadlift.

The Setup

  1. With the bar on the ground, walk up to it leaving an inch or two between your shins and the bar.
  2. Your feet should be in your power stance. (See notes section below)
  3. “Hinge” down o the bar by shifting your weight on to your heels and pushing your butt back until your shins make contact with the bar. (See notes section for comments on knee placement.)
  4. Maintain a flat back and a “big” chest. (Create a “big” chest by puffing your chest out. Picture the guys that want to act tough walking through high school hallways.)
  5. Grab the bar about an inch outside of your shins. You don’t want your thumbs touching your shins.
  6. Your eyes should be about 6-8 feet in front of you on the ground and remain there the entire time. This keeps your chin and thus your head in a neutral position.

Tips:

  • Your power stance is where you feel you can create the most power from. A good way to find this is to take one step and act like you are going to do a vertical jump. After bringing the second foot forward, as in a jumping movement, look down at your feet and this is going to be your power stance.
  • By “hinging” down to the bar your knees should be “soft” or slightly bent. Definitely not in a locked put position and not as bent as in a squat.
  • I highly advise using the double overhand position when first learning how to deadlift. When you become sufficient with the technique go ahead and try the over-under grip which allows you to lift more weight.

The double overhand Grip

The over-under Grip

Breaking the Bar

When you are in the correct position the last thing I advise you to do is to take a deep breath in at the same time you “break” the bar. Breaking the bar reinforces that your back is engaged, especially your lats, and that your grip is as strong as possible. It also takes the remaining slack out of the bar. Taking the slack out of the bar is important because like our own bodies, the more slack that is involved in the lift the more energy we need to move it. So before moving the weight we want our own body and also the bar to be as tight as possible.

  1. When attempting to “break” the bar, think about bending the bar around your shins.
  2. It may also help to think about holding a stick out in front of you and snapping it in half. (Be sure to watch video below)
  3. You should instantly feel your lats engage and your lifting buddy should visibly see your lats and upper back tighten.
  4. Depending on the type of bar you are using, you may be able to hear and definitely feel the slack leave the bar. It will most likely make a clicking sound when the slack leaves.

Video Here: Breaking The Bar

Stand Up and Lockout

  1. When pulling the weight off the ground be careful not pull or jerk the weight up using your arms.
  2. Think of your arms as just ropes holding the bar as you stand upright.
  3. Instead of jerking the weight up with your arms think about standing up by driving with your legs.
  4. You should feel leg drive, which simply means you feel as though you are pressing the floor with your feet.
  5. Be sure to keep the bar tight to your shins and thighs as you stand up.
  6. You should be standing completely upright in the lockout position.
  7. Your glutes should be tight and your hips “driven” forward.
  8. Be sure not to arch your lower back. Your hips are driven forward but everything from the waist up is in a neutral upright position.

Tips:

  • When returning the bar to the ground simply reverse the process by shifting your weight onto your heels and pushing your butt back.
  • Be sure to maintain the structured back and big chest on the way down.
  • Keep the bar tight to your legs on the way down as well.
  • Your eyes should remain in the same spot on the way down.

Reap the Benefits

There is a definite separation in the gym between those people that deadlift properly and those that do it wrong or not at all. Like I said, it is a grown man or grown woman lift. It isn’t easy by any means but it is worth learning. Once you become stronger in the deadlift you will notice that you feel stronger overall and a good chance even more athletic. Also, you will actually experience less low back pain throughout your daily life because of the improved strength. So, learn it, perfect it, and reap the benefits of the deadlift.

As always, thanks for reading and please let me know if you liked this type of instructional article and be sure to subscribe to the site to stay up to date on future articles.

Check out the video below that puts everything together.

Video Here: Deadlift